Concentration

Stephanie Masters

smasters@crimson.ua.edu

Stephanie is a 1st year student working with Dr. Joan Barth. Broadly, she is interested in gender development, stereotypes, and peer relationships, with particular focus on how these variables may affect educational occupational outcomes across the lifespan. Stephanie earned her BA in psychology and MS in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Tyler.

Rebecca Bauer

rhbauer@crimson.ua.edu

Rebecca Bauer is a second year graduate student in the Cognitive Psychology and Developmental Science dual program, working with Dr. Ansley Gilpin.  Before coming to UA, Rebecca earned her MA in Psychological Science from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington.  Rebecca is interested in creativity and imaginative processes and how they relate to executive functioning and language throughout the lifespan. Further, she is interested in whether creativity and imagination are modifiable and whether improvement can positively impact other skills

Sunmi Seo

sseo4@crimson.ua.edu

Sunmi is a third-year doctoral student in developmental science at UA working with Dr. Kristina McDonald. Her research interests include peer relationships, parent-adolescent relationship, and adolescents’ behaviors. For her dissertation, Sunmi is focusing on how popularity goals and popularity affect adolescents’ aggression and peer victimization.

Jenna Reardanz

jlreardanz@crimson.ua.edu Advisor: Frances A. Conners

Jenna Reardanz is a third year student working with Dr. Fran Conners and Dr. Kristina McDonald. She received her B.A. from Whitworth University (Spokane, WA) with a major in Psychology and minor in Theology. Her research interests center around disability and social development. Additionally, she is interested in how research can best be used to inform and influence policy. In her free time she enjoys reading, swimming, spending time with friends and family, and cheering on the Crimson Tide!

 

Tarsha Patterson

tpatterson1@crimson.ua.edu Advisor: Kristina McDonald

Tarsha is a 2nd year student working with Dr. Kristina McDonald. Tarsha holds dual Bachelors’ Degrees in Psychology and Business Administration from Jackson State University also earned a MS in Clinical Psychology from the Auburn University Montgomery. Her research streams are located at the intersection of aggression, anxiety and parenting. More specifically, Tarsha plans to examine the rates of comorbidity between anxiety and aggression and investigate how parenting behaviors may predict patterns of anxiety and aggression. During her spare time, Tarsha loves to read, travel, and tutor underserved children.

 

Katelyn Massey

kemassey1@crimson.ua.edu Advisor: Jeffrey G. Parker

Kate Massey is a second-year graduate student in the Developmental Concentration. She works with Dr. Jeffrey Parker and her research interests include adolescents’ friendships and individual and contextual characteristics that affect friendship experiences. She is currently working on her thesis examining same-sex triads during competitive activities and the role that gender, triad structure, and friendship jealousy play in behavior.

Amber Ingram

amingram@crimson.ua.edu Advisor: Jeffrey G. Parker

Amber is a 3rd year graduate student working with Dr. Jeff Parker. She received her B.A. from the University of Alabama. Her research interests involve different aspects of adolescents’ friendships, including attachment, jealousy, and romantic attraction. She is also interested in foster children’s friendship experiences. Her thesis explored how sex, self-esteem, and closeness moderate the link between perceptions of intimacy and friendship jealousy.

 

Carmen Farrell

cbfarrell@crimson.ua.edu Advisor: Ansley Tullos Gilpin

Carmen Brown Farrell is a third year doctoral student working with Dr. Ansley Gilpin. Her interests include young children’s social-cognitive development. Her masters’ thesis was conducted on how executive functions relate to understanding deception. Carmen intends to continue to explore how self-regulatory abilities relate to the development of more advanced social skills.